Category: Special Education

Special education teachers work with a variety of different students and kids, who all have their own unique set of needs. These blogs and resources are designed to provide special education teachers with information and knowledge that will allow them to better perform their job!

assistive technology

The Importance of Assistive Technology for Special Education

When working with children who have unique needs, it is important to always think outside of the box. What may work for one child may not be the right fit for another student and their individual needs. Sometimes when children are placed in the least restrictive classroom, it may be helpful to have an assistive technology evaluation done.

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student self advocate

Self-Advocacy for Special Needs Students

Throughout their academic lives, special needs students will have individuals who are advocates for them. This may include teachers, administrators, therapists, counselors, and family members. They often work together at meetings to discuss what plan will be best for the upcoming school year. It is important to allow students to become a self-advocate. This may look different for each student, but it needs to happen. School counselors, special education teachers, and other trusted individuals must help students to work on these skills as they mature.

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special ed teacher shortage

Growing Need for Special Education Teachers

Districts and schools have expressed a concern in the last decade or so about lack of teacher candidate for job openings. Many states have noted a shortage in certified teachers to fill positions that they have within their schools. This problem is definitely growing as some colleges have cut teacher programs. What is becoming worse is the shortage of teachers that are specifically trained in Special Education.

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traumatic brain injury

Working with Students Who Have Traumatic Brain Injury

Could you recognize the signs of a student who may be suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI)? You may think that it is simple, but it can be missed due to symptoms that mimic other things. In addition to this, the pain and trauma of an incident may overshadow what may happen sometime after the incident. While teachers and therapists are not able to make a diagnosis, they are able to tell families if they see something unusual with a student. Traumatic brain injury can cause a wide range of physical and psychological effects. These may alter how the child acts and works in an academic setting, which should be reported to those at home.

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Helping Students with Sensory Issues in School

Imagine sitting in a classroom where you are constantly bombarded with stimuli that others may not even notice. This is the reality for children who have sensory processing challenges. Things which may distract them include the buzzing of overhead lighting, other children talking, pencils scratching on another child’s paper, and a variety of other typical classroom sounds. Some students may seek additional sensory to help them cope with stimuli. Others want to avoid it because it bothers them too much and they do not know how to regulate it. A child’s brain learns how to process different sensory stimuli to keep their system in check. Some children are unable to tune out the background and unneeded information. These kids make up anywhere up to 20% of the population. For those on the autism spectrum, 90% struggle with it in one way or another.

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