Angry Bird is the Word for Speech and Language Goals

angry-bird-speech-therapy-app-game

Angry Birds are here to stay and still extremely popular with children of all ages. The Angry Birds are not only mobile games, there are now board games, books, card games, and more. The best part of Angry Birds is that you can use items that are already out there and make them work for your speech and language sessions.

Play a Round or Two of Angry Birds

Kids love to be able to use iPad, tablets, and computers. If you have access to one of these, there are a variety of Angry Birds apps that are free. Look around for different themes that you can get including Valentine’s Day and Easter. As kids use the app, make up rules for play like:

  • When you knock over one pig you will use a word in a sentence.
  • Knock over two pigs and recite two words that use the /sh/ sound at the end.
  • Stop and describe your strategy. Make verbs a focus, or descriptive words.

The rules can be extremely flexible. Create them in a way that they will focus on IEP goals for each child. While children take turns using the tablet, use a board game version of Angry Birds. There are many sets available in stores. Have students set up the scenes using the cards and pieces inside. Practice using clear, concise instructions, and include descriptive words during the activity. Switch playing set up and when it is complete, take time to fire away at the pigs using the catapult and Angry Birds.

Angry Birds Bingo

Imagine the possibilities with an Angry Birds Bingo game. Thanks to The Autism Helper, there is an Angry Birds Bingo game that you can use for speech and language purposes. There are two different levels of play and bingo player cards that can be printed and laminated for use. Level one focuses on vocabulary and picture identification. During play, children could also describe more parts of the birds or compare and contrast one bird to another. Level two of the game focuses on vocabulary, problem solving, and receptive language.

The sky is the limit in using Angry Birds within speech and language sessions. When kids are actively engaged, it helps them to work more on their current goals and stay motivated. Send home additional ideas for families to use Angry Birds at home for carry over. Think outside of the box and remember to include directions to games or other items in additional languages for families that are multilingual.

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